Texas Rangers Strength & Conditioning

Hip Mobility Series

Hip Mobility Series

In sports, especially baseball, your hips are your “money makers”. Tight hips affect running speed and agility by shortening stride length when you run and reducing stability when decelerate, stop and change directions. Individuals with tight hips are also more likely to experience injuries to the hips, hamstrings and groin. The following drills will improve hip range of motion, strength and stability as you move over and under a series of hurdles while moving forward, backwards and sideways. 

Forward Overs

  • Set up six 30-33” hurdles in a row.
  • Stand facing first hurdle.
  • Step over hurdle with right leg, then left.
  • Continue stepping over each hurdle in row. 
  • Switch directions each set, i.e., alternate the lead leg each set.
  • Stay tall throughout the exercise. 
 
Forward hurdles

Forward Overs

 

Backwards Overs

  • Repeat the previous drill, but this time step over the hurdles backwards.
  • Switch directions each set, i.e., alternate the lead leg each set.
  • Stay tall throughout the exercise. 

Forward/Backwards Over

  • When you can perform both forward and backward overs, alternate stepping forward over one  hurdle with each foot and then stepping backwards over the same hurdle with each foot for for the prescribed number of reps.
  • Switch directions each set, i.e., alternate the lead leg each set.
  • Stay tall throughout the exercise. 

Lateral Overs

  • Same as above, but move sideways over the hurdles .
  • Switch directions each set, i.e., alternate the lead leg each set.
  • Stay tall throughout the exercise. 

 

 
Lateral Hurdles

Lateral Hurdles

 

Lateral Unders

  • Set up six 33-36” hurdles in a row.
  • Stand with one side facing first hurdle.
  • Step under the hurdle with right leg, then left.
  • Continue stepping under each hurdle in row. 
  • Switch directions each set, i.e., alternate the lead leg each set.
 
Lateral Unders

Lateral Unders

 

Alternate Leg Unders

  • When you have mastered the ability to move laterally under the hurdles, change directions on each hurdle, i.e., go under the first hurdle with the right leg first, stand up and face the opposite direction so that you go under the second hurdle with the left leg first. Continue to change directions on each hurdle.

Lateral Overs and Unders (This a great dynamic stretch for the hamstrings and glutes  and increases the range of motion in the hips.)

  • Set up six hurdles in a row with one hurdle being shorter and the next being taller. 
  • Stand with one side facing first hurdle.
  • Step over hurdle with right leg, then step under the second hurdle with the right leg.
  • Continue alternating stepping over and under each hurdle in the row. 
  • Switch directions each set, i.e., alternate the lead leg each set.
  • When you have mastered this drill, change directions on each hurdle, i.e., step over the first hurdle with the right leg first, face the opposite direction and step under the second hurdle with the left leg first. Continue to change directions on each hurdle.

Lateral Skips (Lateral skips are all about rhythm. This is also a great drill to warm-up the hamstrings)

  • Same as lateral over, but this time perform a skip between hurdles as you move sideways over the hurdles .
  • Switch directions each set, i.e., alternate the lead leg each set.
  • Stay tall throughout the exercise. 

Lateral Scissors Kicks (This drill requires you to stay very tall and is a great dynamic warm-up for the hamstring. It also requires a lot of rhythm.)

  • This drill is sometimes called the “Can-Can” because the movement requires that you skip between hurdles and keep your leg straight as it crosses over the hurdle.
  • Same as lateral over, but this time perform a skip between hurdles and keep your lead and trail legs straight as they move over the hurdle.
  • Switch directions each set, i.e., alternate the lead leg each set.
  • Stay tall throughout the exercise. 
 
Lateral Scissors

Lateral Scissors

 

 

 

 

 

About Us

The game of baseball requires strength, speed, power, endurance, core strength, agility, balance and coordination (hand/eye and hand/foot). To improve these qualities it is necessary to “build from the ground up”, by developing explosive legs, a strong and stable core (abdomen, low back, and hip girdle), strong back, stable scapula, mobile thoracic spine and strong mobile shoulders and arms. Your body is a 3-link chain; 1) hips and legs, 2) core and 3) shoulders, arms and hands. Forces needed to swing fast and throw hard are initiated in the hips and legs, and then transferred through the core to the shoulders, arms and hands where they are applied to the bat and ball...

Read More

Spring Training and Testing

This section is to help you understand and prepare for the rigors of the spring training schedule. If you have any questions on how to prepare, please ask a staff member. The rangerstrength.com program is designed with the workload of spring training in mind.

In Mid-January the Surprise Complex opens for players wanting to report early. You will be able to complete the final weeks of your training with the strength and conditioning staff, in addition to your baseball activity. This is a unique opportunity the Rangers provides to its players...

Read More